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Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

We’ve Been Here: Challenging the Erasure of Asian American and Pacific Islanders

April 2017

Wednesday, April 5

Pacific Islander Awareness
12–1:00 p.m.
Malouf 201

Join us for a conversation with the Pacific Islander Civic Engagement Center (UPICEC) and learn about issues that affect the Pacific Islander community.

Founded in 2015 by dedicated community volunteers, the Utah Pacific Islander Civic Engagement Coalition (UPICEC) is the first civic engagement organization of its kind. Drawing from the inherent values and strengths of [Pacific Islander] culture and people, UPICEC (YOU-pee-SECK) strives to empower and give voice to Utah's fast-growing Pacific Islander community.

Friday, April 7

Wednesday, April 5

Fakaleiti, Mahu and Fa’afafine
3–4:00 p.m.
Student Diversity and Inclusion Center

Come learn about multiple third genders in some of Pacific Islander communities. Queer Compass hosts this event.

Monday, April 10

Heritage Keynote: Dr. Mark Martell
12–1:00 p.m.
Malouf 201

Dr. Martell will deliver his talk on The social construction of AAPI and the Implications on their gender and sexuality in pop culture.

As history has shown, Asian Americans are consistently absent, placed in secondary or stereotypical roles, and erased in mainstream popular culture. These practices have led to the placement of Asian Americans as the “Other” and as the "model minority,” permeating racial stereotypes that impact Asian Americans on various levels, including gender and sexuality. Using a critical race theory lens and a historical framework, this talk critiques the underlying themes of how Asian Americans have been presented in pop culture and examines the social, political, and cultural interconnectedness that have resulted in specific media representations of Asian American gender and sexuality. Questions we will engage with include: What role do politics play in what is produced in and for the mainstream popular culture? How are historical portrayals of Asian Americans in popular culture still impacting Asian Americans of today? How are Pacific Islanders, due to historical groupings with Asian Americans, impacted? How are Asian Americans creating their own spaces to challenge invisibility within mainstream media? Where is the Asian American media movement today?

Tuesday, April 11

Film Screening: Mountains that take Wing
4–6:00 p.m.
Malouf 201

This is an opportunity to experience two incredible revolutionaries; Angela Davis and Yuri Kuchiyama discuss their journey on the fight for civil rights.

Wednesday, April 12

Youth Exploring the Resiliency of the Refugee Experience
4–5:00 p.m.
Malouf 201

Refugee students will speak to a panel consisting of professionals and non-profit organizations about questions they have surrounding the refugee community here in Salt Lake. The goal of this event is to create dialogue of issues that affect the community as well as highlight the strength and resiliency of refugees.

Thursday, April 13

Japanese American Internment: A conversation with internment survivor Ted Nagata
4–5:00 p.m.
Gore Auditorium

During World War II between 111,000 and 120,000 Americans from Japanese ancestry were forced into internment camps. Please join us as we welcome survivor Ted Nagata, his talk will focus on an overview of why and how internment happened while also sharing about his own experience.

Thursday, April 13

Crip Culture in the Academy: On Multimodality and Disability Justice
7–8:00 p.m.
Gore Auditorium

The Disability and Neuroscience event series is currently happening. Please check out the fantastic events for this series among those Dr. Lydia Brown’s lecture on Crip Culture in the Academy. Thank you to the Disability and Neuroscience for coordinating these events and bringing Dr. Brown to campus. Please join us in welcoming her. For more information about this event or others from the Disability and Neuroscience event series please email Shamby at spolycronis@westminstercollege.edu