Honors Students in Class

Westminster's Honors College was founded in 1987 as a small program offering an enhanced educational experience to academically talented and highly motivated students. It is now the premiere academic experience on Westminster’s campus for high-achieving students who excel in and out of the classroom. At the center of the Honors experience is a core of specially designed classes where you’ll engage in lively discussions with your classmates and professors.

What You'll Learn

  • Develop confidence in your abilities to understand and discuss complex ideas and texts through an interdisciplinary lens.
  • Engage in problem-solving and research design with guidance from faculty mentors
  • Strengthen your writing and communication skills in intensive, discussion-based seminars.
  • Master the ability to work effectively in groups of diverse people.
  • Make connections between disciplines in classes team-taught by two professors from different educational backgrounds
  • Apply new knowledge and skills in meaningful ways in your educational, professional, and personal lives.

16

Average Seminar Size

3.8

Average GPA

of entering students

29

Average ACT

of entering students

96%

First-Year Retention Rate

(2015–2016)

100%

of incoming, first-year Honors students receive a scholarship

180

Honors Students

8% of the student body

6

Faculty Recipients of the Gore Excellence in Teaching Award

Memberships and Affiliations

The Honors program is an active member of

Nunemaker Place

Tucked among the trees on the bank of Emigration Creek, Nunemaker Place is the official home of the Honors College. With a variety of distinctive spaces, Nunemaker is always busy with students lounging, studying, reading, and engaging in discussions of their latest challenging Honors texts.

Nunemaker Place Building

Throughout the year, Honors students come together to take part in the many Honors traditions held in Nunemaker Place—from the much-anticipated Monte Carlo Night when students and faculty face off for ultimate bragging rights, to the end-of-semester Dead Paper Society where students gather around the fire on Nunemaker’s back porch to burn copies of papers they’d rather not see again.

Here, you’ll also find the offices of Honors College staff and unofficial, but beloved, Honors mascot, Scout.

Read More About Honors

An expert on Honors education, Honors College Dean Richard Badenhausen regularly publishes essays in journals and monographs on issues of interest to the national Honors community.

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